PubhD #6: Physics, Economics and Literature

Moby Dick & Herman Melville signature

Moby Dick & Herman Melville signature

When

Wednesday June 18, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.

What

Three PhD students from completely different academic backgrounds will explain their research to a bunch of people in the pub in exchange for a pint or two.

See The PubhD Format and About pages for more information about what to expect at an event.

The speakers are:

  • Ben Everest (Physics) works in condensed matter theory (Quantum Mechanics) as a PhD student at Nottingham University.
  • Salamat Ali (Economics) is a PhD student in the Nottingham University School of Economics. His research focus is on evaluating the impact of trade facilitation measures in developing countries on the promotion of exports and growth in GDP.
  • Hannah Murray (Literature) is a first-year PhD student at University of Nottingham, Department of American and Canadian Studies. Her thesis explores racial liminality in works of nineteenth-century American literature that prominently feature the space between life and death. The primary authors being studied are Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville and Charles Brockden Brown, as well texts from the American Spiritualist movement of the 1850s-90s.

Where

The Vat and Fiddle pub (in the Golding’s Room),
12 Queen’s Bridge Road
Nottingham
NG2 1NB

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PubhD #5: Biology, Music and Politics

Staphylococcus aureau Magnification 20,000

PubhD #5 is nearly here! It is on Wednesday May 14, 2014 at The Vat and Fiddle pub (in the Golding’s Room).

After the “neuroscience special” we had for PubhD #4, we’re back to our normal format: three students from completely different academic backgrounds will explain their research to a bunch of people in the pub in exchange for a pint or two.

See The PubhD Format and About pages for more information about what to expect at an event.

The speakers are:

  • James Gurney is a PhD student in Microbiology at Nottingham University. His area of research is socio-microbiology. This is the study of how social structures of bacteria populations affect things like virulence. They use evolution theory (kin selection) to examine relationships within bacterial pathogens. He also writes the ‘History of Infection‘ blog.
  • Philip Boast is a PhD student at the Department of Music at Nottingham University. His research area is Music Performance and Phenomenology, with the focus being on rhythm and temporality.
  • Emily St.Denny is a PhD candidate in politics at Nottingham Trent, investigating the role of ideas in shaping contemporary French prostitution policies.

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